Celebrating 100,000 YouTube Subscribers: Our top 10 all-time most-watched videos

May 5, 2018

We love learning. And as developers, we know it’s important to continue learning about the latest developments to our current stack and explore new – and different – technologies. Each GOTO Conference covers exciting and relevant topics in the world of software for all types of developers and architects. Lucky for you, we record the vast majority of the talks from each conference!

With close to 7 million views, we know many of you are already actively watching GOTO Conference talks but we are super proud that now over 100,000 folks are subscribed to receive updates on new videos.

So whether you’re a Java developer interested in learning what’s the buzz about Scala or an architect wanting to understand the real-world practicalities of building serverless apps, our GOTO Conferences’ YouTube channel is a fantastic place to keep learning. Our speakers are the industry experts and top practitioners who share practical knowledge and inspirational insights into the past, current and future of software.

Are you subscribed? Don’t miss out on the latest talks from GOTO Conferences – sign up now to receive updates when we upload new videos.

Here are our top 10 most-watched videos from GOTO Conferences. Scroll down or click on the talk below to watch!

1. Introduction to NoSQL with Martin Fowler at GOTO Aarhus 2012
2. Agile is Dead with Pragmatic Dave Thomas at GOTO Amsterdam 2015
3. User Interface (UX) Techniques with Janne Jul Jensen at GOTO Aarhus 2012
4. Software Design in the 21st Century (Microservices) with Martin Fowler at GOTO Berlin 2013
5. What I Wish I Had Known Before Scaling Uber to 1000 Services with Matt Ranney at GOTO Chicago 2015
6. Microservices at Netflix Scale: Principles, Tradeoffs & Lessons Learned with Ruslan Meshenberg at GOTO Amsterdam 2016
7. The R Language: The Good The Bad & The Ugly with John Cook at GOTO Aarhus 2012
8. The Many Meanings of Event-Driven Architecture with Martin Fowler at GOTO Chicago 2017
9. Frankenbuilds; if Agile is so good, why are our Products so bad? with Gabrielle Benefield at GOTO Aarhus 2012
10. Why Scaling Agile Doesn’t Work with Jez Humble at GOTO Berlin 2015


 

1. Introduction to NoSQL with Martin Fowler at GOTO Aarhus 2012

Martin gives a rapid introduction to NoSQL databases: where they came from, the nature of the data models they use, and the different way you have to think about consistency. From this he outlines what kinds of circumstances you should consider using them, why they will not make relational databases obsolete, and the important consequence of polyglot persistence.

 

2. Agile is Dead with Pragmatic Dave Thomas at GOTO Amsterdam 2015

Dave Thomas was one of the creators of the Agile Manifesto. A year ago, he told us that Agile is Dead. How could this be? Why had he deserted us? And what are we to do?

It turns out that while the “Agile” industry is busy debasing the meaning of the word, the underlying values are still strong. In this talk, Dave will draw a distinction, and show us how to reclaim agility for ourselves.

As usual, he’ll probably end up making some friends, and making some enemies. Which will you be?

 

3. User Interface (UX) Techniques with Janne Jul Jensen at GOTO Aarhus 2012

Most developers today are aware of the importance of creating a good user interface with a high level of usability, but many are lacking the methods and techniques that can help in this process. This session will present to the listeners a range of concrete methods and techniques applicable in different phases of a design process, to handle specific challenges. This will include design patterns, personas, wire framing, paper prototype testing, progressive disclosure, card sorting and creative workshops and many of the methods and techniques will be accompanied by examples.

 

4. Software Design in the 21st Century (Microservices) with Martin Fowler at GOTO Berlin 2013

In the last decade or so we’ve seen a number of new ideas added to the mix to help us effectively design our software. Patterns help us capture the solutions and rationale for using them. Refactoring allows us to alter the design of a system after the code is written. Agile methods, in particular Extreme Programming, give us a highly iterative and evolutionary approach which is particularly well suited to changing requirements and environments. Martin Fowler has been a leading voice in these techniques and will give a suite of short talks featuring various aspects about his recent thinking about how these and other developments affect our software development.

 

5. What I Wish I Had Known Before Scaling Uber to 1000 Services with Matt Ranney at GOTO Chicago 2015

To keep up with Uber’s growth, we’ve embraced microservices in a big way. This has led to an explosion of new services, crossing over 1,000 production services in early March 2016. Along the way we’ve learned a lot, and if we had to do it all over again, we’d do some things differently. If you are earlier along on your personal microservices journey than we are, then this talk may save you from having to learn some things learn the hard way.

 

6. Microservices at Netflix Scale: Principles, Tradeoffs & Lessons Learned with Ruslan Meshenberg at GOTO Amsterdam 2016

Netflix’s world leading streaming service is comprised of hundreds of microservices. We will cover explicit technology choices we made for all of the microservices to work well together, and the lessons learned of things that don’t work well. We will describe the organizational structure inside of Netflix that creates common development, runtime, and operational aspects of microservices. We will discuss how microservices impacted Netflix product development with regards to agility, choice, and standardization. We will summarize where we are now, including an overview of our open source technologies, and where we’re heading in the future.

 

7. The R Language The Good The Bad & The Ugly with John Cook at GOTO Aarhus 2012

R is a domain-specific language for analyzing data. Why does data analysis need its own DSL? What does R do well and what does it do poorly? How can developers take advantage of R’s strengths and mitigate its weaknesses? This talk will give some answers to these questions.

 

8. The Many Meanings of Event-Driven Architecture with Martin Fowler at GOTO Chicago 2017

During my career, I’ve often people heard people describe their systems as “event-driven”. But when looking deeper that phrase seems to lead to some very different architectural assumptions. On a recent workshop we identified four different patterns which tend to appear under the title of “event-driven”: event notification, event-based state transfer, event sourcing, and CQRS. We feel that understanding and using these more precise terms will lead to better communication and decision making.

 

9. Frankenbuilds; if Agile is so good, why are our Products so bad? with Gabrielle Benefield at GOTO Aarhus 2012

It’s not about building the product right, it’s about building the right product.

Scrum and Agile teams can go fast and deliver high quality code, yet the product still fails. When this happens people look around for a new framework, only to see that fail as well.

Rather than continue to build more code faster, we need to look at the systemic reasons for failure. These are tied to a lack of deep understanding of the causes and impacts of the problem to be solved or opportunity to be exploited, unclear and unquantified goals, and a lack of validated learning with rapid user testing.

It doesn’t matter if you use traditional methods, scrum or lean, if you don’t set the right direction it won’t matter which framework you use.

 

10. Why Scaling Agile Doesn’t Work with Jez Humble at GOTO Berlin 2015

There are now several frameworks designed to address the demand for “big agile.”

In this talk Jez will explain the flaws in such frameworks, why they so often fail to produce the desired effects, and what we should do instead. He will also address some common organizational obstacles to moving fast at scale: governance, budgeting, and the project paradigm – and discuss how to address them. Warning: this talk will include liberal use of real, statistically sound data.

 

 

Want to watch more? Visit our YouTube channel to see more awesome talks from GOTO Conferences!